Nutrafoods 1 – 2018 (pdf)

36 

COD: NF1-2018 ita Categorie: ,

Impact of berberine on human gut bacteria
Francesco Di Pierro

Original Research – Review

The use of high-dose omega-3 fatty acids in the management of cardiovascular disease
Barry Sears

Vitamin bioavailability, diet and prandial status: good tips for great results
Vera Mason, Andrea Fratter, Marzia Pellizzato

Can nutrition education improve nutritional status in pregnant women?
Mahsa Mohajeri, Ali Barzegar, Ali Nemati, Peghah Rafati

Assessment of nutritional risk factors predisposing to autism among Saudi children
Sahar A. Ibrahim Hammouda, Azza Abd El Hafiz Alareefy, Anwar Al-Thbiany, Shimaa Farghal, Ghaidaa Al-Harbi, Maha Abduallah, Reem Al-Rehaly, Ghadeer Al-Johani

Technological and quality parameters of reduced-calorie chocolates: a review
Sadaf Nazir, Z.R.A.A. Azad

Physicochemical and pasting properties of barley/wheat flour blends and the physical, baking and sensory characteristics of cakes
Tanzila Hamid, Mudasir Ahmad, Farooq Ahmad Masoodi, Adil Gani, Umera Baba

Scientific Updates

Nanotech – Scientific opinion on the re-evaluation of silicon dioxide (E551) as a food additive
Botanicals – Botanical adulterants prevention program
Scientific Literature – Cardiovascular health 

News Update

Regulatory affairs
Associations
Advertorial – EVRA Srl
Ingredients & Products
Marketing and Trends
News of Industry
Awards
Events
Suppliers Index 

The use of high-dose omega-3 fatty acids in the management of cardiovascular disease
Barry Sears

High-dose omega-3 fatty acids rich in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) can have significant benefits in the management of cardiovascular disease due to their formation of specialized hormones known as resolvins. The appropriate dose can be determined by the ratio of arachidonic acid (AA) to EPA in the blood. This review will summarize the recent data on reducing the AA/EPA ratio and its effects on cardiovascular outcomes.

Vitamin bioavailability, diet and prandial status: good tips for great results
Vera Mason, Andrea Fratter, Marzia Pellizzato

Vitamins are key to human health. Although vitamins are involved in several metabolic pathways, humans cannot biosynthesize them except for vitamin D and vitamin B3, so adequate intake in the diet is crucial. Vitamins are classified as fat-soluble or water-soluble. Fat-soluble vitamins include vitamins A, D, E and K, while water-soluble vitamins include vitamins B and C. Avitaminosis due to imbalanced nutrition, disease or genetic impairment leads to disease, but consumption of vitamin supplements or fortified foods can counteract vitamin deficiency. However, their absorption depends on the type of meal and food matrix composition. Vitamins A, D and E are mainly influenced by lipid content which promotes intestinal uptake. Surprisingly, the fat-soluble vitamin K seems to be unaffected by type of diet, although it has better bioavailability as a food supplement. Water-soluble vitamin absorption is not significantly affected by prandial status or dietary composition. No data are reported for vitamin C, while the vitamin B group needs evaluation by coenzyme.

Can nutrition education improve nutritional status in pregnant women?
Mahsa Mohajeri, Ali Barzegar, Ali Nemati, Peghah Rafati

Background: Nutrition during pregnancy affects the health of the mother and the health and development of the fetus. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a nutrition education program on the diet of pregnant women.
Methods: A total of 120 pregnant women (intervention group: 62, control group: 58) attending our centre at 16–35 weeks of pregnancy were enrolled in our study. A pretested questionnaire was used to collect data on demographics, job, age, medication use and educational level, and food records were collected weekly. Three similar educational sessions were held each week for 12 weeks. Data analysis was performed using SPSS software (version 16).
Results: There were significant improvements in diet diversity (p=0.0001) and nutrient intake (p≤0.05) in the intervention group after the educational program.
Conclusion: Nutrition education can improve the diet of pregnant women.

Assessment of nutritional risk factors predisposing to autism among Saudi children
Sahar A. Ibrahim Hammouda, Azza Abd El Hafiz Al areefy, Anwar Al-Thbiany, Shimaa Farghal, Ghaidaa Al-Harbi, Maha Abduallah, Reem Al-Rehaly, Ghadeer Al-Johani

Introduction: Autism is a neurodevelopmental condition of unknown aetiology which is usually diagnosed in the first 3 years of life. Several studies have linked reduced intake of some nutrients with autism and autism spectrum disorder (ASD).
Objective: To identify nutritional risk factors that predispose to autism among preschool and school children living in Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah city in Saudi Arabia.
Method: Thirty children with autism/ASD aged 2–12 years and 36 matched control children were compared regarding BMI and food intake, using 24-hour recall and a food frequency questionnaire.
Results: Both groups consumed similar amounts of carbohydrates, protein and other nutrients, many of which were below the international recommendations for children of their age. However, children with autism/ASD also consumed significantly less omega-3 and iron than the control group.
Conclusions: Children with ASD, like other children in Saudi Arabia, consume less than the recommended amounts of some nutrients. Autistic children have reduced intake of omega-3 and iron, together with limited intake of many food varieties which could be linked to autism in susceptible children.

Technological and quality parameters of reduced-calorie chocolates: a review
Sadaf Nazir, Z.R.A.A. Azad

The preference for healthier and convenience food products has resulted in a demand for reducedcalorie chocolate which has 20% fewer calories than conventional chocolate but the same brightness, aroma, flavour and hue. The fat replacers used in reduced-calorie chocolate are usually derived from vegetable oils and/or polysaccharides. The vegetable oils include palm oil, corn oil and soybean oil, while the polysaccharides include carrageenan, guar gum and locust bean gum. Gums are considered healthier than vegetable oils but result in a weaker texture. Therefore, vegetable oils are often used in combination with gums to improve the rheological characteristics of reduced-calorie chocolate. Sucrose substitutes include sugar alcohols, dietary fibres, syrups and natural/artificial sweeteners. Sucralose is by far the preferred artificial sweetener because of its stability at higher temperatures. The incorporation of fat and sugar replacers increases the viscosity and slipperiness of reduced-calorie chocolate. Also, reduced-calorie chocolate is more bitter and less sweet than conventional chocolate.

Physicochemical and pasting properties of barley/wheat flour blends and the physical, baking and sensory characteristics of cakes
Tanzila Hamid, Mudasir Ahmad, Farooq Ahmad Masoodi, Adil Gani, Umera Baba

Background: Since barley possesses various components beneficial to health, replacement of wheat flour with barley flour in bakery products could be an attractive approach. Hence, the objective of this study was to replace wheat flour with barley flour for the preparation of cakes. Materials and methods: Test blends were obtained by incorporating barley flour into wheat flour at 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% levels of substitution and the physiochemical and pasting properties of the blended flour were studied. The study also investigated the physical, baking and sensory characteristics of the cakes.
Results: There was a slight increase in protein content from 8.4% to 9.6% and a reduction in moisture content from 13.57% to 11.27% with increasing levels of barley flour. Pasting properties showed significant differences among the samples, with a slight increase in pasting temperature and significant variations in stirring number. The baking time, symmetry index and volume index of cakes decreased with increased barley flour content, but there was no change in organoleptic properties.
Conclusion: Wheat flour can be replaced with up to 50% barley flour with little decline in the quality parameters of cakes.